NEBC, Farmington and Tower Lake: Vicky Simlik and friend, living frac’d: Lands saturated (as happened to Campbells in Alberta); Iridescent greasy slime appearing (as happened to Ann Craft in Alberta); Vegetation dying (as happened at Ernst’s); Bubbling chemical aliens appearing on gravel driveway (never seen before).

Comment by an Albertan:

Oh Jessica, my heart just cries reading this; I’m so angry also; the ignorance of this government and people too why are they not out protesting by the thousands to stop this vile life destroying evil corporation. Our planet is being destroyed right before our eyes quietly, methodically, mercilessly.

Brief Timeline of Experience & Opinions: Simlik vs Encana Ovintiv by Vicky Simlik, June 2020

The oil & gas industry slammed into our community and kickboxed their way across the landscape. The dominant corporation was and is Encana Ovintiv.

The above map illustrates there is no oil & gas free zone to move to in the area. The final count of those people who settled with oil & gas companies, and signed non disclosures either willingly or unwillingly, must be high. And the number of farms that have been sold to companies must also be many. A lot of land around here is owned by oil & gas companies now, too much land!

Our story and experience with Encana is similar to many others who have dealt with them.

A few years ago when my sister was visiting we were talking outside in the yard and our conversation was interupted by something we’ve never heard before. A low, groaning, primitive sound roared from underground in our field. It ended with the sound of a giant sink drain! We were both speechless. My sister whispered to me “what was that?”

An Encana well was being drilled about a mile and a half west of us at the time.

After that, in summary it was years of living in and bearing witness to a slow kill.

I started to notice changes in our environment, kept detailed notes, kept all documents and correspondence, mapped changes to our land, followed your website etc.

I also kept a diary/notebook of earthquakes, shakes, tremors, movements, and timing of the strange new reality, and the obvious stalking done on us. The changes to our place and our lifestyle were dramatic & unusual!

Frac fluids/gases leaking to surface from too much pressure, too many fracs (aka greed) & too much waste and acid gas injection killing vegetation? Where’s BC’s “regulator,” the Oil & Gas Commission? Busy rubber stamping more approvals for Encana Ovintiv and others?

I did what many others have done: responded to and sent out written correspondence, phone calls, emails, consultation notification meetings & nonsense.

It was your website that saved me some time because it clearly illustrated how things really work with the oil & gas industry. Or, how things are designed to not work in our favor.

Our place was becoming dilapidated as a result of Encana Ovintin’s destruction. We’ve lived on our farm for well over 20 years and know the history of the place; it was stable and on stable land, now it’s not. About 4 years ago we received a notice that Encana needed to drill closer than ever to us. (predictable). I told the Oil & Gas Commission if they approve the wellsite that close to us, we’re going to hire a lawyer. The application for said wellsite sat for 400+ days, not approved on the OGC website.

Because of ongoing damage, I contacted lawyers. Were they interested in our case? They said they would look at what we had. I boxed up everything I had regarding oil, gas, BC OGC, Encana, Ministry this and Ministry that and I sent it to them.

We filed our lawsuit Nov. 10 2016. The Oil & Gas Commission approved the Encana wellsite close to us on Nov. 10 2016.

We knew what we were doing, we chose to step through the door labeled “Manipulation & Corruption Enter Here”.

Friends photos above: My friends’ yard is in Tower Lake. You’ve probably driven through there. Following the Alaska Hwy. north from Farmington about 7 miles one would drive through Tower Lake. She noticed them on her gravel driveway in late winter. Long term resident, she’d never seen that before.

Yesterday, I went for a walk in our hayfield. Because of too much rain and too many dugouts, dams and lakes being built for frac water, and too much underground fracking and injecting and general destruction, the land is paying for it. Our hay field is saturated ! the worst part is, when I looked closer at the spongy ground the iridescent greasy stuff is here and there through the whole field.

Refer also to:

Landowner Vicky Simlik: Living frac’d in Farmington, NE BC. They frac you again, and again, and again, and again. The frac quakes harm you & your home again, and again, and again.

Quake Damages Photo B: Patio stones are lifting (similar damages experienced by Ann Craft from frac’ing by Quicksilver near Ponoka):

Quake C Photo: Siding on the house is buckling:

Quake D Photo: Interior home walls cracked and door ruined. No point repairing anything because the quakes keep undoing the repairs:

More damning photos at link.

Vicky Simlik: Living in the middle of a gas field in Canada

Encana EA exemption for proposed sweet gas plant is approved, despite PRRD objections by Stacey Thomas, August 24, 2015, NorthEast News

DAWSON CREEK – Encana’s application to be exempted from an environmental assessment (EA) certificate on the Saturn 15-27 sweet gas plant expansion project in Farmington, B.C. has been accepted by the Environmental Assessment Office (EAO), the Peace River Regional District (PRRD) was informed on August 20.

Encana Corporation is proposing to construct a new sweet gas processing facility at the spot, to be co-located with an existing compressor station about 25 kilometres northwest of Dawson Creek.

The facility will remove water and hydrocarbon liquids from sweet raw gas produced from Encana’s Saturn gas field, to meet transmission pipeline requirements.

Encana had applied for the exemption on March 31, and the EAO had requested comments from the Working Group (including the PRRD) on April 2.

A letter from EAO dated July 31 stated that the EAO had decided that the proposed project “will not result in significant adverse environmental, economic, social, heritage or health effects, taking into account practical means of preventing or reducing to an acceptable level, any potential adverse effects”.

The PRRD had taken a hard line against Encana’s application and against another by Pembina Pipeline Corp. at its April 23 meeting.

“This is a facility that is going to be there for quite some time. It probably will have some type of emissions from the site . . . There’s potential for there to be a long term impact,” said director Rob Fraser at the April 23 meeting.

“To me that’s what an environmental assessment should look at, it’s not just what happens while we’re building it, it’s what happens over time, so I think that this type of project in any case should go through an environmental assessment.”

There had also been concerns expressed by local residents in Farmington, that the expansion of the plant is a far cry from what they had originally been presented by Encana representatives, and what they had agreed to.

It’s never enough to feed the greedy frac frenzy free-for-all. Companies frac us again and again and again, and noisy polluting compressors multiple like rabbits. Our “regulators” know we’re being harmed and our properties damaged, but don’t they give a damn about us, our loved ones, our health, our homes, our lands and businesses or area wildlife, they only care about bullying, lying to, and silencing the harmed so as to keep the frac frenzy escalating.

Vicky Simlik, who lives approximately three miles from the site, wrote a letter of opposition to the EAO at the time of Encana’s application for exemption.

She has lived in her Farmington home for 27 years and told Northeast News that researching and attempting to oppose the expansion near her home has been an ongoing challenge for her.

“Looking right now at the 50 page document Encana sent to the Environmental Assessment Office and just looking at the gigantic size this is going to morph into, yeah, this is a far cry from the compressor station we started with,” Simlik said in an interview with Northeast News at the time of the application.

Typical dishonest Encana/Ovintiv. In 2004, then Encana manager Mark Taylor (later VP at AER) promised in a public meeting in Rosebud the company would never install more than two compressors in a row on one location. (Liar! N0 wonder Mr. Taylor moved up so fast at AER.) At the time, there were already Encana sites around Rosebud with three times more than two compressors in a row. A few examples below of what Encana means by “never more than two.”

Doug McIntyre, spokesperson for Encana Corporation, explained to Northeast News that since the plant will be powered by BC Hydro electricity and is centralized, it will have a small ecological footprint.

The plant will only be using “existing area infrastructure” he said; “We believe, as outlined under the requirements of the Environmental Assessment Act, that this project will not cause significant adverse environmental, economic, social, heritage or health effects.”

Director Leonard Hiebert said at the August 20 meeting that he had been privy to the emissions testing which was conducted by Encana at the site, and was surprised at the low levels they found. Nice, but, I don’t believe it for one millisecond. Did Encana have the facility turned off during testing or test upwind? Encana did fraudulent noise studies in response to my noise compliants, and others in the community, by turning the noisiest compressor off or stuffed insulation where noise mitigation ought to have been. Oil and gas industry emissions testing is nearly always a con job, enabled by testing companies and “regulators.”

The board moved to send a letter to the EAO acknowledging the information.

The project is still subject for approvals under the Oil and Gas Activities Act, Environmental Management Act and the Agricultural Land Commission Act.

PRRD getting tough on industry; says no to environmental assessment exemptions REALLY? OR WAS IT A SET UP WITH ENCANA TO MAKE IMPACTED RESIDENTS THINK AN AUTHORITY WAS GOING TO PROTECT THEM? by Stacey Thomas, April 28, 2015, NorthEast News

DAWSON CREEK – The Peace River Regional District board decided to take a tougher stance with industry, when it rejected two requests for support of exclusion from assessments by the Environmental Assessment Office (EAO) of British Columbia; one from Encana Corporation and another from Plateau Pipe Line. Ltd.

Plateau Pipe Line Ltd.’s Northeast British Columbia Expansion Project by Pembina Pipeline Corp., which will run from north of Wonowan to Taylor through Electoral Areas B and C, has failed as yet to provide requested detailed information to the board or the EAO, and the board decided to put its collective foot down, with director Karen Goodings being particularly outspoken on the matter.

“My biggest concern is for the residents, and the impact on them. They knew a good three weeks ago that we were looking for this information, we still have not received it. I think if we don’t start being a little bit tough then they’ll just walk all over us every time,” Goodings said. …

Encana’s request to be excused from an environmental assessment on its Saturn 15-27 processing facility in Farmington was also before the board April 23.

The project, which will see the construction of a new natural gas processing facility at the site of an existing compressor station, has some local residents concerned at the expansion of what was initially projected to be a small compressor site.

Vicky Simlik, who wrote a letter of opposition to the EAO, has lived in her Farmington home for 27 years, approximately three miles from the site.

“Looking right now at the 50 page document Encana sent to the Environmental Assessment Office and just looking at the gigantic size this is going to morph into, yeah, this is a far cry from the compressor station we started with,” Simlik told Northeast News.

The expansion will affect approximately 18.4 hectares of private land, and will be using the shallow cut method to process sweet raw gas from Encana’s Saturn oil field.

PRRD staff recommended that the board support Encana’s request for exemption from the environmental assessment, however the board disagreed and moved to advise the EAO against the request.

“This is a facility that is going to be there for quite some time. It probably will have some type of emissions from the site . . . There’s potential for there to be a long term impact,” said director Rob Fraser.

“To me that’s what an environmental assessment should look at, it’s not just what happens while we’re building it, it’s what happens over time, so I think that this type of project in any case should go through an environmental assessment.”

Doug McIntyre, spokesperson for Encana Corporation, says that since the plant is centralized and will be powered by BC Hydro electricity, it will have a small ecological footprint.

The production of sweet gas only and the use of “existing area infrastructure” is also a reducer of environmental effects, he says.

“We believe, as outlined under the requirements of the Environmental Assessment Act, that this project will not cause significant adverse environmental, economic, social, heritage or health effects,” McIntyre said.

He also says that Encana Corporation has been consulting with stakeholders in the area of the proposed project, although Simlik herself has not been consulted.

“We’ve actually done quite robust stakeholder consulations leading up to our submission,” McIntyre said. “Certainly we are committed to maintain open dialogue with anyone affected by our operations . . . anything that stakeholders have to say is welcome and their right to do so. It’s part of the process.”

The deadline for comment from affected stakeholders is May 1 2015.

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